Tag Archives: leadership principles

How to Become the Leader You Need to Be

a leader attracts others and points the way

Being a good leader means attracting others and guiding them toward success.

Would you like to be the type of leader that not only other people follow, but are initially attracted to?  If so, in this post, you’ll discover how just one little 5 letter word can be used to provide the inspiration to become, as the US Army slogan says, “all you can be.”  Or at least a better leader than you are today.

WHAT MAKES THE DIFFERENCE

John Maxwell writes extensively on leadership, and what he feels are its attributes and principles.  Some time ago, I read an article by him in which he referred to that little 5 letter word, and it has stuck with me.

If I say the word, “ordinary” – what kind of picture does that produce in your mind?

Something that’s OK, or not bad, maybe, but certainly, not very exciting, right?

But what if I say the word, “extraordinary”.  Notice how that changes the picture for you.  That is something you could get excited about, and so could others, especially in terms of leadership.  And the difference is all contained in those 5 little letters.

Become a better leader by concentrating on the "extra" things

Five Letters That Can Make a Difference In Leaders

 

When it comes to leadership, you can move from ordinary to extraordinary by concentrating on the five “extra” letters, and by choosing to do the “extra” things other people choose not to do.  But as John Maxwell tells us, they don’t have to be big things in order to make that difference.

Choosing to do the extra things has the power to transform common, usual, boring, normal, and  average,

into

uncommon, special, amazing, incredible, and above average.

According to John, the difference separating the two is more often exaggerated in our minds, than it is in action or performance.  Sometimes what we think of as a miniscule separation in execution can actually be monumental in term of results.  John uses the example of the elapsed time of an Olympic champion over his nearest competitor to show the difference between wearing the Gold Medal and not.  Can the slightest of margins change your ordinary life to become extraordinary?

LITTLE THINGS MEAN A LOT

What are some of the little “extras” that can help you make that change?  How about:

* extra effort – doing more than what’s required.  What are you willing to pay for success?

* extra time – investing your most valuable resource to improve yourself.  What are you willing to give up for success?

* help – seeking the wisdom and counsel of those who have gone before .  What are you willing to learn for success?

One might say, it’s really all about going the “extra mile”, when others don’t or won’t.

Dick and Rick Hoyt – THE EXTRA MILE

This is a video Rory made for the song “The Extra Mile”. Set to the inspirational story of the father/son team Dick and Rick Hoyt…this is a powerful message to all of us. Joey adn Rory’s friends Paul Sikes & Bonnie Baker wrote the song and the sing…

 YOUR SUCCESS DEPENDS ON YOU

Putting out a little more effort, investing a little more time, and seeking help when it calls for it, can move you faster on the road to success.   I once heard it said that the distance between ordinary and extraordinary is measured in a tea cup, not a wine barrel.  Following John’s advice can help you become the type of leader you need to be – one that others will respect and follow.

For more wisdom from John, read his book, The 21 Irrefutable Laws of Leadership.

To your success!

JACK KOETTING

 

OG MANDINO – MAN OF ACTION

Og Mandino, business philosopher and man of action

Og Mandino, personal development author and business philosopher

Recently I was re-reading some articles from previous years issues of Success magazine, and I came across an article on Og Mandino.  I was impressed with his story of how he went from a drunken failure to become a great life and business philosopher, and author who influenced millions of lives.   So I figured I would share my thoughts for people out there who had not heard of him.

OG MANDINO – EARLY ON

Og, which is a nickname for Augustine, was born in 1923.  He originally had great dreams, but they were interrupted when his mother died suddenly.  This shock caused him to abandon his plans for college, and instead enlisted in the armed forces as a pilot.  It was here that he met and became friends with a fellow pilot who went on to become famous in Hollywood.  Do you know who?  (answer at the end of this post).

Afterwards, he got married, and attempted to make it in the world of insurance sales.  This was a time of tremendous failure for him, and soon his frustration led him to a drinking problem, which ended up costing him his wife and child.  At one point, he even contemplated suicide.

Think of that –  one of the great business philosophers of this century, was just one step away from making a difference in NO one’s life.

THE DISCOVERY AND TURNAROUND

As he told it, Providence intervened and directed him away from the gun at the pawn shop, to a library nearby where he discovered the world of self-development, motivation and success.  He turned this early discovery into a routine and lifestyle of pursuit of the principles and guidelines for achieving success from reading hundreds of books by many different authors.

Is this a step you would consider as part of your payment for success?

He re-entered the world of insurance again, this time working for one of his mentors, W. Clement Stone.  This time though, having learned some very important lessons, he was determined not to fail.

Sometimes that’s all it takes.  Desire, and the determination for action to make it happen.

LESSONS LEARNED AND SHARED

This time, he didn’t fail.  Promotion followed promotion, and soon he was putting into words his own philosophies of success, as he developed into a personal development author in his own right.

 

His most famous book of the 19 he wrote, was The Greatest Salesman in the World.  The wisdom in this book is contained in the 10 scrolls for successful selling and successful living.  Each scroll contained a principle to be applied in one’s life.  They are

1.  I begin a new life.

2.  I will greet this day with love in my heart.

3.  I will persist until I succeed.

4.  I am nature’s greatest miracle.

5.  I will live this day as if it is my last.

6.  Today I will be master of my emotions.

7.  I will laugh at the world.

8.  Today I will multiply my value a hundredfold.

9.  I will act now.   I will act now.  I will act now.

10.  I will pray for guidance.

As you can see by #10, Og Mandino was a spiritual man, and considered The Bible as one of the 12 greatest inspirational and self-help books ever written.  He was a man of action, and he believed that everyone was unique, and deserved the opportunity to struggle for success.  After all, he was able to turn his life around, and he believed that everyone with the desire to do so, could if they applied action to their dreams and aspirations.

Og Mandino – Make YOUR Life Worth Remembering

www.derrenandcarlytaylor.com

Og Mandino died in 1996 at the age of 72, but not before changing the lives of many people who heard him speak or read his books.

Treasure House Within You: Now is a Time

treasurehousewithinyou.blogspot.com2/28/12

I will act now. Success will not wait. If I delay, success will become wed to another and lost to me forever. This is the time. This is the place. I am the person. Og Mandino. By Geophrey A. Tenganamba: gtlivemore@gmail.com

If you’ve read The Greatest Salesman in the World or any other books by Og Mandino, please share your thoughts in the comment section below.  And the guy who became a Hollywood legend – Jimmy Stewart. 

For other books and videos on business philosophy and success, please check out my Success Resources Store.

Jack Koetting

 

 

 

 

 

Leadership – Reflections on Coach John Wooden’s Wisdom

John Wooden, coach and mentor

John Wooden - Coach and Philosopher

JOHN WOODEN – A CENTURY OF MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Believe me it’s been a long, long time since I stepped out on the court to compete in the game of basketball.  In fact, I really only played one year in high school.  I was a skinny kid, and not very good, so the next year I opted for jazz band instead, which steered me to my eventual degree in music.  But that doesn’t mean I didn’t understand the game and the strategies.  My court heroes at the time were names like Wilt Chamberlain, Bill Russell, Jerry West, Bob Pettit, and Elgin Baylor.  (Am I showing my age?)  The responsibility of implementing and teaching those strategies, from the bench at UCLA, was another person that was making a name for himself,  Coach John Wooden.
 

John Wooden

John Robert Wooden (born October 14, 1910) is a retired American basketball coach. He is a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as both a player (class of 1961) and as a coach (class of 1973). He was the first person ever enshrined in both categorie…

Direction On and Off the Court

John Wooden lived to be almost 100 years old and was one of the winning-est coaches in college basketball.  But coach John Wooden wasn’t only a success in the game of basketball, he was also a success in the game of life.  He was a positive thinker, an innovator, and a motivator that was able to transform his command of the game into other areas outside basketball.

Advice From Dad

 
He was often heard quoting the “two sets of three” which he said he learned from his father.  “Never lie, never cheat, never steal” and “don’t whine, don’t complain, don’t make excuses”.  Timeless advice still today.  And certainly things that can be applied to entrepreneurs in their business endeavors.
 
John Wooden was also known to have carried in his wallet a piece of paper given to him by his father that contained the following advice:
Be true to yourself.
Make each day your masterpiece.
Help others.
Drink deeply from good books.
Make friendship a fine art.
Build shelter against a rainy day.
Pray for guidance and give thanks for your blessings every day.
 

The 9 Self Promises

John Wooden was certainly given good advice from his father, but John also came up with some pretty good insight and leadership principles on his own, which he followed and taught.  John imparted some of his leadership wisdom through the written word.  Coach Wooden’s Pyramid of Success: Building Blocks For a Better Life
and Wooden on Leadership: How to Create a Winning Organization
showcased his ability as an author.   John Wooden felt that if you made the following 9 promises to yourself, you would be well on your way in your pursuit of happiness in life.  They are:
 
1.  Promise yourself that you will talk health, happiness and prosperity as often as possible.
2.  Promise yourself to make all your friends know there is something in them that is special that you value.3. Promise yourself to think only of the best, to work only for the best, and to expect only the best in yourself and others.4.  Promise yourself to be just as enthusiastic about the success of others as you are about your own.

5.  Promise yourself to be so strong that nothing can disturb your peace of mind.

6.  Promise yourself to forget the mistakes of the past, and press on to greater achievements in the future.

7.  Promise yourself to wear a cheerful appearance at all times, and give every person you meet a smile.

8.  Promise yourself to give so much time improving yourself that you have no time to criticize others.

9.  Promise yourself to be too large for worry, too noble for anger, too strong for fear, and too happy to permit trouble to press on you.

John Wooden: Coaching for people, not points

www.ted.com With profound simplicity, Coach John Wooden redefines success and urges us all to pursue the best in ourselves. In this inspiring talk he shares the advice he gave his players at UCLA, quotes poetry and remembers his father’s wisdom.TEDTa…

An Example To Follow

Leadership is all about setting an example to inspire others to achieve their individual and team goals.  We as leaders would do well to make these nine self promises, and see how far it takes us.  It’s not about being the MVP on the basketball court. It’s about using leadership to develop teamwork that produces lasting results – something Coach John Wooden was very, very good at.

Jim Rohn – Leadership Personified

The Wisdom of Jim Rohn

America's Foremost Business Philosopher

Jim Rohn was affectionately called, America’s Foremost Business Philosopher, and was one of the most upbeat and positive people I’ve had the pleasure of listening to.  His uncanny ability for getting right to the point of what matters most, made him highly sought after by leaders in all kinds of organizations.  However, his influence probably affected more people in the network marketing industry than any other.  Jim believed in the learning of business skills, and right there at the top of the list was leadership.

What is leadership Leadership is, as defined by Wikipedia, ” the process of social influence in which one person can enlist the aid and support of others in the accomplishment of a common task.”  Judging by that definition, and one’s understanding of the importance of teamwork  in network marketing, it’s not hard to see why Jim Rohn resonated so well with networkers, especially in the are of leadership skills.  It was some time ago when I came across a post by  Twila Jacobs that I was impressed with, on the Seven Qualities of Leadership by Jim Rohn.  In this particular rendering, for the first 6, he used “be” and “but not” in combination to make his point.

Whether in print, audio or video, Jim Rohn had the knack for saying the right things that made you think.  Sometimes clever, sometimes humorous, always brutally honest when it came to imparting wisdom on leadership, and how to add value to yourself, as well as  those around you.  Of course,  Jim  himself, was also involved in, and a great advocate of, the network marketing industry.  In these times of economic unrest, I miss hearing his fresh, positive perspective on pursuing the American dream and the success it offers.

If you desire to be a leader in your organization, whether in network marketing or traditional business, you can’t go wrong if you study the philosophy of Jim Rohn.

Challenges to Pursue

15 minute section of classic Jim Rohn. Buy Jim Rohn products at www.yoursuccessstore.com

THE SEVEN QUALITIES OF LEADERSHIP

1. Be strong, but not rude.

2. Be kind, but not weak.

3. Be bold, but not a bully

4. Be humble, but not timid.

5. Be proud, but not arrogant.

6. Be fun, but not foolish.

And then he wrapped it up with

7. Deal in reality and truth.

Short and to the point, these are truly pearls of wisdom from a great gentleman.  Click the link below for more wit and wisdom from Jim.

Jim Rohn Quotes – BrainyQuote

www.brainyquote.com

Share the best Quotes by Jim Rohn with your friends and family at BrainyQuote.com.

Leadership is a learn-able business skill, and one that Jim Rohn personified.  If you’ve been influenced by any of his books, audios, or videos, feel free to comment below.  Check the SUCCESS RESOURCE link at the top of the page for materials by Jim.

Jack Koetting

www.carspluscash.com/pianoman

www.carspluscashsystemrocks.blogspot.com

Leadership Priniciples From An Unlikely Source

I guess we all have a certain idea in our head of what a leader should do, say, look, or act like.  But sometimes those preconceived notions can cause us to overlook a “diamond in the rough”.  I received this the other day from a networker friend of mine, and it really touched me.  I felt that with it being  close to Memorial Day and Independence Day, times when our military is honored, I would include it here.  I apologize in advance for its length, but I didn’t want to pare it down at the risk of losing its impact.  It’s not what you could describe as “current events” as the original article was published in 2001.  But the advice is just as relevant today (maybe more so).  Anyway, I felt everyone could benefit from it, so here it is.  It’s written by a military man, so you’ll encounter a little “service lingo”, but you’ll get the gist of it.  Read, learn, and then, be the leader you can be, and help make a difference.

LESSONS IN LEADERSHIP: From a Janitor

Wharton Leadership Digest, December 2001   By Colonel James E. Moschgat, Commander of the 12th Operations Group, 12th Flying Training Wing, Randolph Air Force Base, Texas

William “Bill” Crawford certainly was an unimpressive figure, one you could easily overlook during a hectic day at the U.S. Air Force Academy. Mr. Crawford, as most of us referred to him back in the late 1970s, was our squadron janitor.

While we cadets busied ourselves preparing for academic exams, athletic events, Saturday morning parades and room inspections, or never-ending leadership classes, Bill quietly moved about the squadron mopping and buffing floors, emptying trash cans, cleaning toilets, or just tidying up the mess 100 college-age kids can leave in a dormitory.

Sadly, and for many years, few of us gave him much notice, rendering little more than a passing nod or throwing a curt, “G’morning!” in his direction as we hurried off to our daily duties.

Why? Perhaps it was because of the way he did his job-he always kept the squadron area spotlessly clean, even the toilets and showers gleamed. Frankly, he did his job so well, none of us had to notice or get involved. After all, cleaning toilets was his job, not ours. Maybe it was is physical appearance that made him disappear into the background. Bill didn’t move very quickly and, in fact, you could say he even shuffled a bit, as if he suffered from some sort of injury. His gray hair and wrinkled face made him appear ancient to a group of young cadets.  And his crooked smile, well, it looked a little funny. Face it, Bill was an old man working in a young person’s world. What did he have to offer us on a personal level?

Finally, maybe it was Mr. Crawford’s personality that rendered him almost invisible to the young people around him. Bill was shy, almost painfully so. He seldom spoke to a cadet unless they addressed him first, and that didn’t happen very often. Our janitor always buried himself in his work, moving about with stooped shoulders, a quiet gait, and an averted gaze. If he noticed the hustle and bustle of cadet life around him, it was hard to tell.  So, for whatever reason, Bill blended into the woodwork and became just another fixture around the squadron. The Academy, one of our nation’s premier leadership laboratories, kept us busy from dawn till dusk. And Mr. Crawford…well, he was just a janitor.

That changed one fall Saturday afternoon in 1976. I was reading a book about World War II and the tough Allied ground campaign in Italy, when I stumbled across an incredible story. On September 13, 1943, a Private William Crawford from Colorado, assigned to the 36th Infantry Division, had been involved in some bloody fighting on Hill 424 near Altavilla, Italy. The words on the page leapt out at me: “in the face of intense and overwhelming hostile fire … with no regard for personal safety … on his own initiative, Private Crawford, single-handedly,  attacked fortified enemy positions.” It continued, “for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty, the President of the United States …”

“Holy cow,” I said to my roommate, “you’re not going to believe this, but I think our janitor is a Medal of Honor winner.” We all knew Mr. Crawford was a WWII Army vet, but that didn’t keep my friend from looking at me as if I was some sort of alien being. Nonetheless, we couldn’t wait to ask Bill about the story on Monday. We met Mr. Crawford bright and early Monday and showed him the page in question from the book, anticipation and doubt in our faces. He stared at it for a few silent moments and then quietly uttered something like, “Yep, that’s me.”

Mouths agape, my roommate and I looked at one another, then at the book, and quickly back at our janitor. Almost atonce we both stuttered, “Why didn’t you ever tell us about it?”

He slowly replied after some thought, “That was one day in my life and it happened a long time ago.”  I guess we were all at a loss for words after that. We had to hurry off to class and Bill, well, he had chores to attend to.

However, after that brief exchange, things were never again the same around our squadron. Word spread like wildfire among the cadets that we had a hero in our midst-Mr. Crawford, our janitor, had won the Medal! Cadets who had once passed by Bill with hardly a glance, now greeted him with a smile and a respectful, “Good morning, Mr. Crawford.”

Those who had before left a mess for the “janitor” to clean up, started taking it upon themselves to put things in order. Most cadets routinely stopped to talk to Bill throughout the day and we even began inviting him to our formal squadron functions. He’d show up dressed in a conservative dark suit and quietly talk to those who approached him, the only sign of his heroics being a simple blue, star-spangled lapel pin.

Almost overnight, Bill went from being a simple fixture in our squadron to one of our teammates. Mr. Crawford changed too, but you had to look closely to notice the difference. After that fall day in 1976, he seemed to move with more purpose, his shoulders didn’t seem to be as stooped, he met our greetings with a direct gaze and a stronger “good morning” in return, and he flashed his crooked smile more often. The squadron gleamed as always, but everyone now seemed to notice it more. Bill even got to know most of us by our first names, something that didn’t happen often at the Academy. While no one ever formally acknowledged the change, I think we became Bill’s cadets and his squadron.

As often happens in life, events sweep us away from those in our past. The last time I saw Bill was on graduation day in June 1977. As I walked out of the squadron for the last time, he shook my hand and simply said, “Good luck, young man.”

With that, I embarked on a career that has been truly lucky and blessed. Mr. Crawford continued to work at the Academy and eventually retired in his native Colorado where he resides today, one of four Medal of Honor winners living in a small town.

A wise person once said, “It’s not life that’s important, but those you meet along the way that make the difference.” Bill was one who made a difference for me. While I haven’t seen Mr. Crawford in over twenty years, he’d probably be surprised to know I think of him often. Bill Crawford, our janitor, taught me many valuable, unforgettable leadership lessons. Here are ten I’d liketo share with you.

1. Be Cautious of Labels. Labels you place on people may define your relationship to them and bound their potential. Sadly, and for a long time, we labeled Bill as just a janitor, but he was so much more. Therefore, be cautious of a leader who callously says, “Hey, he’s just an Airman.” Likewise, don’t tolerate the O-1, who says, “I can’t do that, I’m just a lieutenant.”

2. Everyone Deserves Respect. Because we hung the “janitor” label on Mr. Crawford, we often wrongly treated him with less respect than others around us.  He deserved much more, and not just because he was a Medal of Honor winner.  Bill deserved respect because he was a janitor, walked among us, and was a part of our team.

3. Courtesy Makes a Difference. Be courteous to all around you, regardless of rank or position. Military customs, as well as common courtesies, help bond a team. When our daily words to Mr. Crawford turned from perfunctory “hellos” to heartfelt greetings, his demeanor and personality outwardly changed. It made adifference for all of us.

4. Take Time to Know Your People. Life in the military is hectic, but that’s no excuse for not knowing the people you work for and with. For years a hero walked among us at the Academy and we never knew it. Who are the heroes that walk in your midst?

5. Anyone Can Be a Hero. Mr. Crawford certainly didn’t fit anyone’s standard definition of a hero. Moreover, he was just a private on the day he won his Medal. Don’t sell your people short, for any one of them may be the hero who rises to the occasion when duty calls. On the other hand, it’s easy to turn to your proven performers when the chips are down, but don’t ignore the rest of the team. Today’s rookie could and should be tomorrow’s superstar.

6. Leaders Should Be Humble. Most modern day heroes and some leaders are anything but humble, especially if you calibrate your “hero meter” on today’s athletic fields. End zone celebrations and self-aggrandizement are what we’ve come to expect from sports greats. Not Mr. Crawford-he was too busy working to celebrate his past heroics. Leaders would be well-served to do the same.

7. Life Won’t Always Hand You What You Think You Deserve. We in the military work hard and, dang it, we deserve recognition, right? However, sometimes you just have to persevere, even when accolades don’t come your way. Perhaps you weren’t nominated for junior officer or airman of the quarter as you thought you should – don’t let that stop you.

8. Don’t pursue glory; pursue excellence. Private Bill Crawford didn’t pursue glory; he did his duty and then swept floors for a living. No job is beneath a Leader. If Bill Crawford, a Medal of Honor winner, could clean latrines and smile, is there a job beneath your dignity? Think about it.

9. Pursue Excellence. No matter what task life hands you, do it well. Dr. Martin Luther King said, “If life makes you a street sweeper, be the best street sweeper you can be.” Mr. Crawford modeled that philosophy and helped make our dormitory area a home.

10. Life is a Leadership Laboratory. All too often we look to some school or PME class to teach us about leadership when, in fact, life is a leadership laboratory.  Those you meet everyday will teach you enduring lessons if you just take time to stop, look and listen. I spent four years at the Air Force Academy, took dozens of classes, read hundreds of books, and met thousands of great people. I gleaned leadership skills from all of them, but one of the people I remember most is Mr. Bill Crawford and the lessons he unknowingly taught. Don’t miss your opportunity to learn.

Bill Crawford was a janitor. However, he was also a teacher, friend, role model and one great American hero. Thanks, Mr. Crawford, for some valuable leadership lessons.

In 1984, President Ronald Reagan officially presented the Medal of Honor to Bill Crawford.  William Crawford passed away in 2000. He is the only U.S. Army veteran and sole Medal of Honor winner to be buried in the cemetery of the U.S. Air Force Academy.